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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2451/14629

Title: Technology Acceptance and Performance: A Field Study of Broker Workstations
Authors: Lucas, Henry C., Jr.
Spitler, Valerie
Issue Date: Jun-1997
Publisher: Stern School of Business, New York University
Series/Report no.: IS-97-09
Abstract: We develop a model to predict 1) the use of a multifunctional, broker workstation with a windowed interface and 2) the relationship between workstation use and performance. Brokers and sales assistants in the private client group of a major investment bank use this workstation as an integral part of their jobs. Our model explains some of the variance in their usage, intended usage and performance, but the variables that are most salient in the model differ between brokers and sales assistants. There is evidence that low performing brokers use the workstation more than higher performing brokers; the results also suggest that a different type of training may be needed for sophisticated workstations for professionals than for clerical personnel learning to use transactions processing systems. We believe it is important to understand the acceptance of technology and the relationship between system use and performance if firms are to obtain a return from investing in information technology.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2451/14629
Appears in Collections:IOMS: Information Systems Working Papers

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